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July 14, 2011
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The Fairy Catcher_Process by Wildweasel339 The Fairy Catcher_Process by Wildweasel339
This is a process walkthrough of this painting here: [link]
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:iconsepiawren:
SepiaWren Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2012  Student Digital Artist
A very useful insight into your work process, thank you! The details on lighting and composition tricks are particularly useful, as well as the idea of using one unifying warm colour underneath the cool ones (I can often see this technique in finished images, but am never quite sure how to start with it myself). Thanks again for sharing this!
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:iconsolomon-russell:
solomon-russell Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
I like your demos, it's giving a clear idea of how to put these together.
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:icontwinkletinker:
twinkletinker Featured By Owner Jul 18, 2011   General Artist
thanks for the walthrough and for the inspiring words... I always get that feeling with my works as well. :D
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:iconhappyhenry:
HappyHenry Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
A great tutorial and inspiring words. I have to comment on your statement, "..."Thats what keeps me eager to start on the next..." That is inspiring! I am just learning to let go and paint with the realization that THIS one may not be perfect but I shall continue to paint another and another...
This is a great tutorial, thank you.
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:iconforgetdeny:
ForgetDeny Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Very informative. I particularly appreciated what you had to say about the use of overlay and multiply functions; it's always seemed to me that a refusal to use these tools is simply a refusal to fully utilise the digital medium - the use of them is in no way "less artistic" than a refusal to use them, and with my background in oil painting I can certainly agree that they in fact function in much the same way as a wash of paint thinned with a combination of linseed oil and turps.
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:iconalorasaur:
Alorasaur Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2011  Student Traditional Artist
Awesome job!
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:iconcristinabencina:
cristinabencina Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2011  Professional General Artist
interesting using the warms under the blues. I remember a long time ago one of my teachers told me to do that, I guess it slipped my mind. I shall note that. :D thanks for the tutorial!
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:icontuszek:
tuszek Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2011
Thank you for sharing! :)
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:icondarkpistachio:
DarkPistachio Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2011  Student General Artist
Ah, excellent, was hoping you'd put up something about this one.

That dark wine colour to the left of the catcher still has me totally mystified -- the colour choice I mean. It really livens up that space, but I'd never think to use it in that context. If you have time, I'd love to hear how you arrived at it.

Thanks for posting this, always helpful to hear the thoughts behind a painting.
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:iconwildweasel339:
Wildweasel339 Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Like you said, the deep red-violet there is mainly intended to liven up the area. There are several reasons you might want to us a color in that way. Purples work well in shadows because they are a transition from warm to cool. You can see that color used in many of the dark areas, like on the tree. I could have left only the dull darkness there, but it didn't seem appropriate for a magical forest. Had this been a more realistic painting, I would have used more grays and less colors in general. In some ways it is also a bit random even to me though. I tend to toss colors around and hope they land in interesting places. It keeps the image fresh after many hours of noodling.

Colors can be very wild and unnatural as long as the values are kept in order. I hope this helps! :)
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